In this post, I'll discuss more of my opinions regarding JavaScript development. Please read the first post in the series if you haven't already. In this post, I'll cover some relatively important language features that don't seem to be covered in a lot of basic JavaScript guides. I'm assuming you have a basic knowledge of JavaScript. Let's begin.

Functions are variables

In most programming languages, functions are a pretty basic language feature. They're quite nice for structuring your code, but don't really have any built-in awesomeness. Some programming languages have features to dynamically call functions at run-time (usually referred to as reflection), but JavaScript has a LOT more power in this area. In JavaScript, functions are known as first-class objects. Functions are stored in normal variables, and you can create new ones (known as anonymous functions) and edit existing ones on the fly. Functions can also be return values from other functions! This enables a whole range of different programming techniques known as metaprogramming.

Let's take a look at some examples.

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In this post, I'll discuss some of the techniques that I personally write JavaScript. There's no right or wrong, this is all my opinion (still, feel free to flame me if you feel it's necessary :P). This post is aimed at people that understand basic JavaScript and HTML techniques, and want to see how I code my JavaScript. I will talk about the JavaScript of the past, how it's changed, and some techniques used in modern JavaScript development. This will probably be a multi-part series if I ever get around to writing more posts :P 

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Well, back to posting coding-related blog posts, for now anyways :P. Seeing as a lot of people seem to be confused by Object Oriented Programming, I thought I'd post a quick (or maybe not so quick) post about what OOP is, the main features, and how it can benefit you. This is paraphrased from an assignment I had on OOP last semester at university. I use C# code examples throughout this, but the concepts are very similar in other languages. Note that in this post, I assume you know the basics of programming, and just want to learn more about object orientation.

Now, let's begin looking at what OOP actually means. At its core, the Object Oriented paradigm consists of classes and objects. A class is a “thing” or entity that has a purpose, and an object is an instance of this entity. For example, a Car would be a class, and my car would be an object (instance of the Car class).

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